Frequently asked questions

Adoption

I cannot afford a lawyer.  Will I be responsible for paying my attorney's fees?


As the birth mother, you are entitled to independent legal representation. Your attorney's fees will be paid for by the adoptive parents.




Do I have to live in Maine?


You can choose adoptive parents that reside in Maine whether or not you reside in Maine. If you live in another state, we will cooprate with an attorney in your home state to make sure your rights are protected.




Can I choose the adoptive family?


Absolutely. This choice is entirely yours. If you need help finding adoptive parents, please see the Resources section of this page.




What is the difference between an "open" or a "closed" adoption?


An open adoption is one in which the birth mother and the adoptive family know the identity of each other and there is a mutual agreement to foster a relationship between the child and the birth mother. Although the birth mother will have a relationship with the child, the adoptive parents retain all legal parental rights regarding the child. A closed adoption is one in which the birth mother has no direct contact with the adoptive parents and the adoptive parents know little about the birth mother.




What qualifications must adoptive parents meet?


Prospective adoptive parents must pass an in-depth home study and background screening in addition to other criteria depending on which agency they work with.





Surrogacy

If I choose to be a surrogate, do I get to choose the intended parents?


Yes. You are in total control of deciding who you work with. The surrogacy relationship needs to be a comfortable match for all parties involved.




What does surrogacy entail?


Surrogacy is a lengthy but rewarding process for all parties involved. Please see the article posted in our blog detailing The Surrogacy Process in Maine.




What are the requirements to be a surrogate?


Legally, there are five requirements to be a surrogate in Maine according to The Maine Parentage Act: Title 19-A Section 1931. In order to qualify as a surrogate you must: (1) be at least 21 years of age; (2) have previously given birth to at least one child; (3) have completed a medical evaluation and a mental health evaluation; (4) have independent legal representation paid for by the intended parents; (5) not contribute eggs or genetic material unless you are a family member of one intended parent. The agency you work with, should you choose to work with an agency, may have additional requirements including, but not limited to, your BMI, financial situation, and criminal history.




Do I have to live in Maine?


You can choose intended parents that reside in Maine whether or not you reside in Maine. If you live in another state, we will cooprate with an attorney in your home state to make sure your rights are protected.




I cannot afford a lawyer.  Will I be responsible for paying my attorney's fees?


As a surrogate you are entitled to independent legal representation. Your attorney's fees will be paid for by the inteded parents.





ART

What is "assisted reproductive technology"?


According to the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (asrm): "Assisted Reproductive Technologies are all treatments which include the handling of eggs and sperm and/or embryos. Some examples of ART are in vitro fertilization (IVF), gamete intrafallopian transfer (GIFT), pronuclear stage tubal transfer (PROST), tubal embryo transfer (TET), and zygote intrafallopian transfer (ZIFT)."




What are my options for my stored embryos?


Many couples find themselves in the situation of deciding what to do with remaining frozen embryos once their families are complete. You may choose to donate these embryos to another woman or couple struggling with infertility. It is an incredible gift to donate your embryos so another family can have a chance at growing their family. If you are open to embryo donation, please know you can donate anonymously or openly. You may also choose to donate these embryos to scientific research.




What is "third party reproduction"?


Third party reproduction is a term used to describe the situation in which a couple uses a gestational carrier, an egg donor, and/or a sperm donor to help them become parents.





  • Facebook
  • Instagram

This website contains general information about Oleaga Law LLC, family law, and laws related to assisted reproductive technology, artificial conception, third party reproduction, surrogacy, and adoption.  Neither this website nor its contents should be construed as legal advice.  An attorney-client relationship is not created by viewing this website nor by sending any communication through this website or directly to Oleaga Law LLC. Oleaga Law LLC expressly disclaims all liability from actions or inactions based on the content of this website.

©2020 by Oleaga Law LLC. All rights reserved.